Your School Library

Why Reading?

April 27, 2010

Why Reading?

In previous conferences, we have focused on 21st century learning, information literacy, and teacher and school librarian collaboration. We have also looked at the role of the teacher librarian/school librarian as a transformational one. And in this conference, I think we broaden our professional visions to consider other questions. How does information literacy development link to our role in collaborating with colleagues to promote reading?  How can we communicate our critical role in information literacy development through a perceived focus (perception of teachers, parents, administrators, public) of TL/school librarian as reading promoter? What are the practices of school libraries around the world? How can school libraries and public libraries collaborate, build relationships and advance both reading and IL? I am asking  a lot of questions hoping there will be discussion, and more questions.

10 Responses

  1. James Henri says:

    You are on the money Sandra.

    For much of my professional life I have underplayed the role of the school library vis a via reading/childrens literature. My work in China with the Chen Family Foundation http://www.chenyetsenfoundation.org/eng/studies.php has forced me to shift my views. Reading is fundamental. Not print reading alone of course. And both reading for pleasure and reading for information are important.

    Its only when the school librarian loses focus on information leadership (information literacy, information policy, knowledge building, knowledge management) because of a myopic focus on reading that the professional role goes backwards and out the door.

    So bring it on I say :)

    James

    April 27th, 2010 at 1:52 am
  2. Sue Warren says:

    I agree James,I think that almost all of us see our roles as enormously multi-faceted – if we are to continue to elevate our profile as valued professionals, we must not be solely focused on the information leadership aspect (with its ever-burgeoning enormity) but continue to encourage reading for pleasure. I have worked with so many students who, because they are reluctant readers for pleasure, are then not successful or competent when it comes to reading for information – because they do not have the range and experiences of strategies,critical analysis, conceptual understandings, transference of knowledge and so on. And there’s rarely an issue getting those children who are able, fluent and experienced ‘on board’ with their pursuit of information – my dilemma is always with those who are so resistant to reading that they find it almost impossible to cope with their information needs.

    May 27th, 2010 at 11:16 pm
  3. James Henri says:

    Love your work Sue. Thanks for the encouragement. Best wishes James

    May 28th, 2010 at 1:12 am
  4. Jola Pytel says:

    I think that you’re right John. Reading id fundamental. But we as librarians can show it in so many aspects. I’m really fond of meeting with authors. I’m sure it’s the straight way to improve reading. Especially younger pupils like this kind of entertainment. At my school library it’s not short term- interesting in literature of meeting authors. Pupils keep in touch with them by mails, send their own proposal of novels and poetry. And they so happy when the answers come to their mails.
    It’s fantastic way of happinnes with reading, this wonderful world ,so undervalued nowadays.
    I recommend author visits -it’s really make changes.
    Best luck,
    Jola

    May 29th, 2010 at 3:44 pm
  5. Dr. Sam Chu says:

    Subject: information literacy development and reading
    My presentation to be delivered on June 7 is related to how an improvement of students’ information literacy might link to their improvement in their reading ability. I applied an inquiry project-based learning approach that involved the collaboration of three kinds of teachers (general studies, language, and information technology) and the school librarian in guiding primary 4 (grade 4) students through group projects. Under this collaboration, the teaching librarian focuses on equipping students with needed information literacy knowledge and skills for doing their inquiry projects. Besides measuring students’ improvement in their level of information literacy, I also examined their improvement in a number of core competencies including reading ability.

    May 31st, 2010 at 10:51 am
  6. Sue Warren says:

    I’ll be extremely interested to learn more about your research Sam. Look forward to the presentation. Do you see the improvement as a parallel process or as one leading to improvement in the other?

    June 1st, 2010 at 6:31 pm
  7. maria jose vitorino says:

    (i) How does information literacy development link to our role in collaborating with colleagues to promote reading?

    Information literacy reveals itself, as time goes by, as a fusion-concept (like fusion gastronomical answers), emerging from “critical thinking” and from “reading” semantic fields. Ewe learned that is it impossible to promote IL without promoting reading, and it is real both ways…
    To promote any skills inside schools, and specially through school libraries as one of school’s hearts is impossible using just one mind and two hands – schools are plural, teamwork places. Like car engines, they need special energy sources – they move by collaboration.
    IL “development link” could be an helping hand for that collaboration, if SL staff uses this to connect with other colleagues, teachers as well as Public librarians, and resist to temptation of call IL “their own and only of them” special knowledge.

    June 6th, 2010 at 10:59 am
  8. maria jose vitorino says:

    (II) How can we communicate our critical role in information literacy development through a perceived focus (perception of teachers, parents, administrators, public) of TL/school librarian as reading promoter?
    Improving action that shows that, more than repeating verbal arguments noone listen to… we need to have common and happy memories valuing IL and TL/SL action, shared among those agents. Specially if we can build them with short budget.

    (iii) What are the practices of school libraries around the world?
    Who knows? IASL knows? IFLA knows? How many different SL worlds exist?

    (iv) How can school libraries and public libraries collaborate, build relationships and advance both reading and IL?
    Recognising each other existence as positive for both and specially for a common aim.
    Improving staff training on IL and reading, including public and school libraries professionals continuous training inside or outside local projects development
    Improving connections among “bosses” of public libraries and of school libraries that support collaboration practices really improved and designed for each real community, region, country actual context.

    thanks sandie for another thinking window YSL4

    June 6th, 2010 at 12:29 pm
  9. Sam Chu says:

    Thanks for showing interest in my research. My presentation has been uploaded. Look forward to hear comments from you.

    Regarding whether the improvement is a parallel process or as one leading to improvement in the other, I believe you are referring to the improvement

    of students’ group project work (when compared to students who worked on a similar project a year ago) and the improvement of students in 8

    dimensions of learning (reading and writing abilities, information and IT literacy, and others). I do see that it is a parallel process. Let me take information literacy as an example. Equip students with skills and knowledge they need (including information literacy) for their project, then they will do well with their project. And many librarians and educators try to help students to learn about info lit. And one good way to achieve this is to get them work on a substantial project which they enjoy. During the process, students can learn info literacy with proper guidance from librarians.

    June 10th, 2010 at 5:40 am
  10. Annika says:

    Every time I think you guys can’t come up with another wonderful article, you do!

    November 13th, 2010 at 9:40 pm